Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Oral Anatomy
 
No. 1 
HOME
 
Page 3 of 7
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
 

 
The incisors
Fig.3-1. The Central Incisors
    There are four in number, two in the upper arch and two in the lower arch. The incisors are used for shearing and cutting.

The canines

 
Fig.3-2. The Canines
    The longest teeth in the mouth. Canines are located at the corners of the mouth, both in the upper and lower arch, numbering four in all. Because of its long, strongly developed roots, this teeth is usually the most stable. Its crown contour also promotes a self cleansing property, thus making it usually the last tooth to be lost. 
    Its function supports the function of both Incisors and premolars. The name canine is derived from its resemblance to the prehensile teeth of the Carnivora. 

The Premolars 

 
Fig.3-3. The Premolars
    Most widely termed as bicuspid. There are eight in number, four in the upper arch (two in each side, 1st and 2nd Premolar) and same thing in the lower arch. These teeth are absent in the primary set of teeth (or the baby teeth or milk teeth.) Premolars succeed the primary molars. And in case you have a chance with your Dentist to do an RCT on your upper First Premolar and wonder on the higher fee compared to doing an RCT of an incisor, don't wonder now. Upper first Premolar have two roots and two pulp canals. Although there are instances when the two roots are fused, two pulp canals are always present anyway. The upper second Premolar has one root and mostly has one pulp canals, although two pulp canals can sometimes be present. 
 
Fig.3-7. Specimens of 1st Premolars showing their roots and their pulp canals.
 
The molars (first and Second) 
 
Fig.3-4. The molars.
    There are actually a total of 12 molars in all, including the third molars when present. There are three molars in each quadrant, both in the upper and lower arch. 
 
Fig.3-5. A right or left quadrant means the right or left of an arch, separated by the midline.

    As you can see above in our heading, I mentioned only the first and second molars only. I intend to separate the third  molars since these teeth are always subjected to various anomalies and variations. Thus, it has a special place then in this tour. 
    There are three molars in each quadrant, both in the upper and lower arch. The first molar appears in the oral cavity at the age of 6 years posterior to the second primary molar. The molars (both in the upper and lower arch) are larger teeth which are used for grinding food. Although the upper molars differ in size and anatomy of the lower molars, they are designed to perfectly occlude to each other. They have cusps that rest on the grooves of its opposing teeth. 

The third molars 
    This is the tooth which we termed as the "Wisdom Tooth." This tooth, as we have repeatedly state, is the most  "abnormal" of all teeth. This tooth can sometimes resemble the anatomy of another tooth, can be large and can be very small, can have normal roots or fused roots, can erupt normally or be impacted, or can even be absent. 

 
Fig.3-6. An example of how a third molar can be impacted.

But its absence nor its presence doesn't have to do with an individuals intelligence, by the way. The name wisdom tooth is derived from the fact that perhaps that it erupts at a late, mature age of 17 years and even later. I will feature a discussion about it on the segment The "Molar Truth" is... soon. Watch  for it!


Page 3 of 7
1
2
3
4
5
6
7